Winter wedding planning – with a blizzard in the forecast, will your wedding go on as planned? How wedding insurance may save your winter wedding day

Making the best of a snowy wedding day

Making the best of a snowy wedding day

As I write this, light snow is lazily falling outside my Lexington, MA home. However, the weather people tell us that soon we will be hit by a blizzard of possibly historical proportions that will last until mid-day Saturday. Already, flights are cancelled, schools are closed, and many weekend sporting events have been rescheduled.

Blizzard weddings can be beautiful. Take a look at this story of one Philadelphia-area couple who made it work, as well as this story of a blizzard wedding in Minnesota.

But what if your wedding (or Bar Mitzvah, or 50th Wedding Anniversary party) was supposed to happen tomorrow, at the height of (or just in the aftermath) of the blizzard? Yes, the weather is supposed to calm down by Saturday afternoon, but if you are in an area that hits the jackpot and gets up to 30 inches of snow over the next 24 hours, there is no question that your event could be affected. Guests who are travelling may simply not be able to get there. Local vendors may have difficulties getting the supplies they ordered, much less getting to the venue. Your venue may lose power. What should you do?

In the best of all possible worlds, you would have thought ahead and bought insurance to cover the possibility that some unforseen event might affect your ability to carry off your event as planned. After all, with the average cost of a wedding in the United States now approaching $27,000, you have an expensive investment to protect. Basic policies cost anywhere from $200 to $600 small change to protect yourself, especially if you are having a winter event. One company, Wedsure, advertises policies starting at $95.

Wedding policies vary widely in what they cover, but a good one will cover the cost of rescheduling in the event of bad weather – such as a blizzard. They can also protect against the illness of essential participants, no-show vendors, and venues cancelling on you. There are additional riders that usually can be purchased, such as protecting yourself against liability resulting from a guest getting ill or injured or damage to the wedding site.

There are specialty wedding insurance companies (just google “wedding insurance”), but you may first want to check with your own insurance agent as to what may already be covered under your existing policies (such as coverage for the theft of gifts through your homeowner’s or personal property insurance).

One thing wedding insurance doesn’t cover? Last-minute cold feet (and I don’t mean the kind that comes from being outside in the middle of a blizzard). If that happens, you’re on your own.

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